When do I need an H-Class inspector and what hazardous area work is considered to be prescribed works?

The requirements for H-class inspections and prescribed works is detailed in the Victorian Electricity Safety (General) Regulations 2019 Version No. 001 meaning this only applies in the state of Victoria.

Before we start with the details, I think it is first worth defining the requirements for prescribed works under the Electricity Safety (General) Regulations 2019 Version No. 001. We have provided relevant extracts from the document:

“Division 11—Inspection of electrical installation work

249 Electrical installation work that must be inspected

(1) For the purposes of section 45 of the Act, prescribed electrical installation work means work on all or part of any of the following electrical installations if they are ordinarily operated at low voltage or a voltage exceeding low voltage”

The following is the line that specifically deals with hazardous areas:

“(h) electrical equipment installed in a hazardous area and electrical equipment associated with the protection of a hazardous area but not installed within the hazardous area;”

The following is the line that identifies works that are excluded from the definition of prescribed works:

“(4) For the purposes of section 45 of the Act, prescribed electrical installation work does not include— (a) the repair or maintenance of a single component part of an electrical installation; or

(b) the replacement of a single component part of an electrical installation by an equivalent component part at the same location; or

(c) the installation or connection of a consumer billing meter.”

Based on the information above a number of parameters need to be met in order to determine if the installation works are prescribed or non-prescribed and require an H-Class inspector. To determine if an H-Class inspection is required 2 questions can be asked:

  1. Has work been carried out on all, or part of an installation (excluding repair or replacement of single component like for like) that is ordinarily operated at low voltage or a voltage exceeding low voltage? and,
  2.  Is that LV electrical equipment installed in a hazardous area, or is that electrical equipment associated with the protection of a hazardous area but not installed within it?

It is our opinion that if the answer to those 2 questions is yes then the works are prescribed.

 

“This following information represents and opinion only of a general nature, the specifics of each individual situation must be taken into account with reference to the relevant Legislation, Codes of practice and Australian standards. Professional advice should be sort if there is any doubt.”

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